At times like these we remember just how connected we all are – and how much we depend on one another. While different people are being affected in different ways by the Covid 19 crisis, we all have a stake in tackling it in the best way possible. We are, quite literally, in this together.

Sometimes, good things come from bad situations. The crisis has shown that looking out for each other is an essential human attribute. It has shown that, no matter our differences, most of us want others to be safe; we think those having a tough time need and deserve support; and we want to do our bit for our community and wider society.

Over the last few weeks, it has become patently clear how much we rely on the institutions and trusted professionals who are working so hard each day to keep us safe and provided for. It has also become apparent just how threadbare many of our public protection bodies have become. Years and years of cuts to bodies like the NHS, councils, and police and ambulance services have stretched these vital public protectors to the limit – even before this crisis hit.

UK public bodies guard the protections put in place to ensure our collective wellbeing. This is true, not just in our healthcare system, but in every area of life – from the food we eat, to the way we’re treated at work, to the things we buy. This web of public protectors acts like our country’s immune system; identifying and eliminating risks, thereby preserving the health of the whole. When this network is weakened, it is much harder for societies to respond to shocks and emergencies.

How we act now is a choice. The decisions our government makes can set a better course for the future, by making sure our public protection infrastructure is more resilient in the long term, and by putting strong protections in place to safeguard those who need it when emergencies do arise – like gig economy workers. Ultimately, only governments can make and strengthen the rules that keep us safe and properly resource the bodies which exist to defend them.

Most of us would back these kinds of decisions. Stronger protections for people and the environment, properly resourced public bodies, fair enforcement of the rules – these are things that are supported by most British people.

This won’t be the last time countries around the world face huge challenges. Sometimes, problems will be caused by natural events. Other times, shocks will be caused by the actions of businesses – like the 2008 financial crash. Either way, the Covid 19 pandemic shows that it doesn’t make sense to wait for disasters to happen before taking action. Clearly, prevention is better than cure.

At a human level, the pandemic has shown us that it makes sense to have each other’s backs. If the government too learns this lesson – that protecting those who protect us all is pure common-sense – then we will come through this crisis, and be stronger as a result.

Emma Rose is Director of Unchecked UK

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At times like these we remember just how connected we all are – and how much we depend on one another. While different people are being affected in different ways by the Covid 19 crisis, we all have a stake in tackling it in the best way possible. We are, quite literally, in this together.

Sometimes, good things come from bad situations. The crisis has shown that looking out for each other is an essential human attribute. It has shown that, no matter our differences, most of us want others to be safe; we think those having a tough time need and deserve support; and we want to do our bit for our community and wider society.

Over the last few weeks, it has become patently clear how much we rely on the institutions and trusted professionals who are working so hard each day to keep us safe and provided for. It has also become apparent just how threadbare many of our public protection bodies have become. Years and years of cuts to bodies like the NHS, councils, and police and ambulance services have stretched these vital public protectors to the limit – even before this crisis hit.

UK public bodies guard the protections put in place to ensure our collective wellbeing. This is true, not just in our healthcare system, but in every area of life – from the food we eat, to the way we’re treated at work, to the things we buy. This web of public protectors acts like our country’s immune system; identifying and eliminating risks, thereby preserving the health of the whole. When this network is weakened, it is much harder for societies to respond to shocks and emergencies.

How we act now is a choice. The decisions our government makes can set a better course for the future, by making sure our public protection infrastructure is more resilient in the long term, and by putting strong protections in place to safeguard those who need it when emergencies do arise – like gig economy workers. Ultimately, only governments can make and strengthen the rules that keep us safe and properly resource the bodies which exist to defend them.

Most of us would back these kinds of decisions. Stronger protections for people and the environment, properly resourced public bodies, fair enforcement of the rules – these are things that are supported by most British people.

This won’t be the last time countries around the world face huge challenges. Sometimes, problems will be caused by natural events. Other times, shocks will be caused by the actions of businesses – like the 2008 financial crash. Either way, the Covid 19 pandemic shows that it doesn’t make sense to wait for disasters to happen before taking action. Clearly, prevention is better than cure.

At a human level, the pandemic has shown us that it makes sense to have each other’s backs. If the government too learns this lesson – that protecting those who protect us all is pure common-sense – then we will come through this crisis, and be stronger as a result.

Emma Rose is Director of Unchecked UK

< BACK